A Twist on Cold Process Soapmaking: The Room Temperature Method

A Twist on Cold Process Soapmaking: The Room Temperature Method
Add to Favorites It’s no surprise that many consumers are turning to homemade soap for their body wash, hand soap, and even shampoo and conditioner needs. Today’s retail market is heavily saturated with bars that are simply detergent; chemical compounds, water, and synthetic fragrances intended to cut through grease, dirt, and oils without leaving any residues behind. This approach to creating body bars may provide a long-lasting scent but it also can drain many skin types of hydration and leave skin irritated and prone to rashing with its harsh cleaning ingredients.   True soap is actually the blended combination of saponified oils, colorants, and fragrances. While some soapers may use scientifically derived colorants like mica powder and faux scents, it’s the oil solution in the soap that acts as a humectant — hydrating the skin in addition to removing debris.  There are three common approaches to soapmaking; Cold Process, Hot Process, and Melt and Pour.

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